Disco Sec

October 23, 2008

By Mike Landry
A shot of Christof Migone's laser-cut work, "Rimmed Record."

A shot of Christof Migone's laser-cut work, "Rimmed Record."

Invite Montreal-based multidisciplinary artist and writer Christof Migone to a party, and it’s a safe bet he’ll spend his time scoping out your books and record collections. It’s something he says is “a lot less daunting than talking to somebody,” and can tell you just as much about the person.

The phenomena is the subject of his latest exhibition Disco Sec. The show features six different works which draw from the artist’s record collection for material, and tying them together is one disco ball with its mirrors stripped off in a pile below the black orb.

“It bypasses those iconic images and associations we have with the word portraiture and reinvigorates the word,” says Migone. “Bypassing the psychology of a person ultimately gets you back to that. It becomes just as personal and intimate to know how many records a person has and what those records are than if they were to sing you a song.”

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COM POSE

October 23, 2008

By Mike Landry
A participant using Ellen Moffat's "vBox."

A close up view of Ellen Moffat's "vBox."

During the last five years of his life, Saskatoon-based artist Ellen Moffat‘s dad suffered from dementia. His language deteriorated beyond the point of common understanding. However, Moffat found she was able to communicate on a different level. It struck a chord, and she realized how restricted we are using words to communicate.

Moffat’s idea of what she assumed to be language changed. She began to notice how the amount of media we’re inundated with daily removes meaning from the information. The cacophony blurs notions of left and right, and point of views become more like data than language.

Her coming exhibition, COM POSE, takes this shift in language as its subject. In one piece language is broken down to its vocal sound components (called phonemes), and in another text becomes a toy.

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They Are Making Art

October 9, 2008

By Mike Landry
Daniel Wong and Mary-Anne McTrowe are ready to make some art.

Daniel Wong and Mary-Anne McTrowe are ready to make some art.

In the song “East Coast West Coast” Mary-Anne McTrowe describes herself as “an East Coast artist. I like systematic stuff, but I’ve never rally made anything because the ideas are good enough.” Her band mate, Daniel Wong, then chimes in, “I’m a West Coast artist. I’m a touchy feely guy. I like to watch all the birds and clouds as they float across the sky.”

A true art band, The Cedar Tavern Singers AKA The Phonoréalistes is the brainchild of art history buffs McTrowe and Wong. Under the guise of a folk duo, the pair aim to free art history from its no-fun, stiff-collared academic existence.

“Our attitude towards it is more like those obsessed fans who draw pictures of their rock idols and know every detail about them,” says Wong. “It just happens that our rock idols are people like John Baldessari and Yves Klein.”

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